Oct
13
10:00 AM10:00

Wisconsin Archeological Society Fall Meeting

Location: UW-Baraboo Sauk County
1006 Connie Rd, Baraboo, 53913

The Fall 2018 meeting of the Wisconsin Archeological Society is dedicated to ancient technologies used by peoples to prepare for the harsh winters of Wisconsin 1000 years ago. Please join us for pottery making and stone tool making with some hands-on opportunities to participate! We will also be digging and preparing an underground pit for food storage.

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Oct
11
7:00 PM19:00

Driftless Area Archaeology: A Forty Year Retrospective

Location: Wisconsin Historical Society auditorium (across from the Memorial Union)

Speaker: Robert Boszhardt, Driftless Pathways

About: Join archaeologist and author Robert Boszhardt of Driftless Pathways as he takes us on a journey through the archaeology of the Driftless Area, from the hidden rock art of Tainter Cave, to the ancient stone quarries at Silver Mound, to state-of-the-art mound-hunting technology.

Free and open to the public

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Oct
9
7:00 PM19:00

The End of Effigy Mounds: A View from Above

Date: Tuesday, October 9, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Location: Harrington Hall, Room 217

Speaker: Amy Rosebrough, Ph.D., Staff Archaeologist, Office of the State Archaeologist, State Historic Preservation Office, Wisconsin Historical Society

Abstract: Theories concerning the end of effigy mound building have centered around scenarios of uniform culture change, invasion, or mass emigration. A review of late Effigy Mound complex sites suggests that different effigy-building Late Woodland communities may have reacted to the appearance of Cahokians in Wisconsin in different ways, creating a short burst of diversity and complexity in material culture and social networks before lifeways re-converged on a new pattern that we term ‘Oneota’. LiDAR imagery, in particular, is shedding new light on Late Woodland settlement and ceremonial systems in southwestern Grant County, raising the possibility that one of Wisconsin’s best known site-unit-intrusion villages is more home-grown than previously thought.

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Oct
8
7:00 PM19:00

Current Archaeology by Beloiters: Reports from the Midwest Archaeological Conference

Date: Monday, October 8 at 7:00 p.m

Location: Godfrey 102 (Logan Museum) on the Beloit College campus

About: Learn about current Midwestern archaeological research in posters by Beloit students Wendi Wingerson ’19 and Blaine Burgess ’20 and in a slide talk coauthored by Bill Green and Shannon Fie. Research to be discussed:

Wendi Wingerson ’19 (and Natalie Mueller), “Sumac for Food or Ceremony? Paleoethnobotanical Analysis of Middle Woodland Medicinal Plants”

Blaine Burgess ’20 (and Dana Mineart), “The Golden Eagle Site (Illinois): An Attribute Analysis of Lithics”

Bill Green and Shannon Fie (with Lynn Alex and Robin Lillie), “Rediscovering Toolesboro, a Middle Woodland Mound Group in Southeastern Iowa”

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Milwaukee AIA Lecture - The Middle Trempeauleau Mississippian Colony
Sep
30
3:00 PM15:00

Milwaukee AIA Lecture - The Middle Trempeauleau Mississippian Colony

Location: 3413 N. Downer Ave, Milwaukee Sabin Hall Room G90

Speaker: Ernie Boszhardt, Independent Scholar

About: Coinciding with the dawn of the Middle Mississippian Culture at the ancient city of Cahokia nearly 1,000 years ago, a group canoed over 500 miles up the Mississippi River to establish a settlement at Trempealeau, Wisconsin. Antiquarian records alluded to distinct platform mounds and exotic ceramics, but only recently has the age, extent, and purpose of Trempealeau’s very early Mississippian expression been thoroughly explored. Ongoing excavations since 2010 have revealed that the Cahokians carried ceramic vessels and a variety of flint stones from their homeland along with their architecture and religion to this far-flung yet short-lived outpost; and why they came to Trempealeau.

Robert “Ernie” Boszhardt is a Wisconsin archaeologist with over 40 years of experience. His research has focused on the unglaciated Driftless Area of western Wisconsin where he has studied and written extensively about nearly all aspects of that region’s archaeological heritage, including Paleoindian, Hopewell, Effigy Mounds, Oneota, rock art, and most recently Middle Mississippian. He currently is co-owner of Driftless Pathways LLC. with his wife Danielle Benden who together direct the Trempealeau Archaeology Project.

Boszhardt-authored books on the Trempealeau research and regional rock art will be available for purchase and signing at the talk.

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Sep
13
7:00 PM19:00

The Lake Winneconne Park Site: Searching for an Early Historic Native American Occupation in Winnebago County

Date: Thursday, September 13, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Location: Wisconsin Historical Society auditorium (across from the Memorial Union)

Speaker: Dr. Jeff Behm, UW-Oshkosh

About: A severe windstorm in 2001 toppled a large cottonwood in Lake Winneconne County Park (now Lake Winneconne Park) in the Village of Winneconne.  This event exposed a previously unreported archaeological site.  In addition to the expected shell-tempered Lake Winnebago Trailed Oneota pottery and associated materials, eight small rolled metal beads made of European smelted copper kettles were recovered from water screen residues.  These beads, which could date from the Protohistoric through Middle Historic Period, could represent the long-sought historic Oneota Horizon and linkage with the Winnebago (Ho-Chunk). Unfortunately, the disturbed context of the tree tip prevented the documentation of a firm association between Oneota ceramics and European-source metal. 

In 2017 the UW-Oshkosh Archaeology Field School investigated the Park.  Shovel testing determined the extent and boundaries of the site.  A 4m x 4m excavation block was placed close to the location of the 2001 tree tip.  Half of the units (in a checkerboard pattern) were dry screened in the field through 1/4-inch mesh.  The intact deposits from the remaining 8 units were water screened through 1/16 inch mesh in order to recover a wider range of materials, including small metal beads and other trade items.. 

Excavations and subsequent inventorying of the large number of samples from the 2017 field work demonstrated the expected presence of a multi-component site, with Late Archaic through Oneota occupations confirmed.  While no additional historic Fur Trade Era artifacts were identified, several likely, but previously unrecognized historic Native American potter sherd have been identified.  The dating and specific ethnographic assignment of these ceramics remain in question.

Free and open to the public

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Sep
11
7:00 PM19:00

The Pope Site (47-Wp-163), Waupaca County, Wisconsin: Recent Laboratory and Field Work and an Update of an Iconic Early Holocene Late Paleoindian/Early Archaic Fire Sacrifice Site

Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Location: Harrington Hall, Room 217

Speakers: Ray Reser, Ph.D., Director, Natural History Museum, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and Jeffery A. Behm, Ph.D., Anthropology Program, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

About: The Pope site was discovered by Paul Pope in 1971 when he plowed up a small concentration of thermally fractured points. The numerous thermally fractured points were initially identified as Scottsbluff. Because some bones found with the point fragments were initially identified as human the site was identified as a human cremation burial and compared to the Renier site from the Door Peninsula portion of Brown County. Based on the perceived similarity of Renier, Pope, and other sites, the Renier Ceremonial Complex (RCC) has been recently proposed. Limited test excavations centered on the location of the fire feature in April 2018 recovered additional artifactual material and has substantially clarified the nature of the Pope site. The ritual nature of the Pope site fire feature is confirmed, but its specific role, and the validity of the RCC is called into question. Reanalysis of the Pope site points has resulted in their reclassification as Hardin Barbed. This has significant implications for understanding the interaction of the diverse and dispersed Early Holocene populations of hunter-gatherers in the Upper Midwest.

This is the first of nine scheduled monthly meeting and program for the 2018-2019 meeting year of the Robert Ritzenthaler Society’s meeting year. Monthly meetings and programs are generally scheduled for the second Tuesday of the month from September through May. All programs sponsored by the Ritzenthaler Society are free and open to the public. Please extend an invitation to attend to your friends.


Book Sale: The sale of books, reports, journal issues, and magazine will continue. Thanks to all who have donated books, magazines, and academic journals to this ongoing sale. The proceeds of the sale go to the Ritzenthaler Archaeological Society’s treasury.

Archaeology Month Posters and Bookmarks: The remaining posters (a shipwreck) and bookmarks (an eared Scottsbluff) celebrating Wisconsin’s Archaeology Month (May 2018) will be available for pick-up at the September Meeting.

Building Location: Harrington Hall is located on the west side of the T-intersection of John with Elmwood on the east side of the UW-Oshkosh campus.

Parking: We have permission to use UW-Oshkosh Lot 34 from one half hour before until one half hour after our meetings. This is the lot east of Elmwood and south of John – the one we regularly use for the meetings in Harrington Hall. We have access from 6:30 pm to 10:30 pm. If you park in the lot before 6:30 pm (even just for a few minutes) you are very likely to get a parking ticket. Remember that you must park within the lines of the parking stall, with the rear of the vehicle toward the aisle. We do not have permission to use any other parking lot. You will get a ticket if you park in any other lot. You may also be able to find parking on John Street or Scott Avenue.

Handicap Access: Ground level access to Harrington is available at the southern entrance to Harrington. An elevator is available in the south end of the building. There is no parking next to the building. You can make arrangements to be dropped off at the south side of the building.

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Sep
10
7:00 PM19:00

Archaeology of the Founder's Family: Investigating the home of Minerva Peet Fuller

Date: Monday, September 10, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Location: Godfrey Anthropology Building, Room 102

Speaker: Dr. Jeff Behm, UW-Oshkosh

About: In 2006, Beloit College students, faculty, and staff and community volunteers exposed and excavated part of an 1840s-1850s house site at the parking lot behind the college's Guest House. The house belonged to Minerva B. Fuller and was home to Minerva, her son Charles, and a Norwegian immigrant young woman named Julia. We recently discovered that Minerva was the sister of Beloit College founder Stephen Peet: her full name was Minerva Beulah Peet Fuller. This presentation summarizes the documentary record and the archaeological findings - structures, pit features, artifacts, and animal bones - and discusses the site's significance in terms of campus archaeology and family, college, and community history.

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May
19
10:00 AM10:00

Satterlee Clark House Archaeological Excavations

Please Join the Horicon Historical Society and the Wisconsin Archeological Society as we conduct an "open-to- the public" archaeological excavation of the backyard of the Historic Satterlee Clark House in Horicon WI. (The site of an early to mid 1800's trading post and (Winnebago) Native American village site.)

This event encourages children and adults of all ages to come out and help us excavate a few archaeological features on the property.

Under the guidance of professional archaeologist you can help excavate and screen for potential historic and prehistoric features and artifacts buried on the Clark House Backyard lawn.

No experience is necessary.

Satterlee Clark was the Sutler of Fort Winnebago in the 1830's and came over to Horicon to establish a trading post and then eventual home by 1855. His house is located on the high ground overlooking the mouth of the Horicon Marsh where the Rock River Flows to the south and beyond.

Previous yard work construction to build a stone slab walkway and shovel probe tests relieved large areas of early historic period garbage middens and potentially intact archaeological features.     

Also that day: The Historic 1855 Satterlee Clark House and the rebuilt Historic Hustisford one-room-school house will be open to the public for tours. There is a large prehistoric archaeological artifact collection located and displayed in the adjacent one-room-school house which highlights Dodge County's prehistoric past.

This event is free and will run from 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM on Saturday, May 19th, 2018.

If it is raining that day the event will be cancelled and possibly reschedule at a near future date.

For any additional information or questions please contact event organizer Kurt A. Sampson at 414-405-4367 or by email at kurtsampson68@gmail.com.

The Clark House is located at 322 Winter street (The Horicon Historical Society)

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May
14
7:00 PM19:00

Wisconsin's Effigy Mounds

Date: Monday, May 14, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Location: Beloit Public Library, 605 Eclipse Blvd., Beloit, Wisconsin

Speaker: Amy Rosebrough, Staff Archaeologist at the State Historic Preservation Office

About: Wisconsin’s Late Woodland residents built thousands of earthen burial mounds in the form of animals, spirits, and people between AD 700-1200. Today, new technology and review of old excavations combine to give us a more complete understanding of Wisconsin’s enigmatic effigy mound-builders and their eventual fate.

Free and open to the public.

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May
14
7:00 PM19:00

Uncovering Protohistory: A Report on Ongoing Excavations and Geophysics at Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, Illinois

Speaker: Dr. Madeleine McLeester

Location: UW-Milwaukee
3413 N. Downer Avenue, Milwaukee
Sabin Hall Room G90

Abstract: Ongoing excavations of the Middle Grant Creek (MGC) site at Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie in Northern Illinois are expanding our understandings of lifeways during the final period before European arrival. This well-preserved site is one of the only single component protohistoric sites remaining in Northern Illinois and is providing researchers a unique glimpse into protohistoric communities. In this presentation, Dr. McLeester will discuss the artifact assemblage, including unexpected finds such as marine shell and painted pottery, indicative of far flung trade relationships. She will also discuss her use of new drone based thermal imaging and historical image analysis to locate previously unknown features and expand existing site limits. Throughout the presentation, Dr. McLeester will discuss how this public archaeological project is exposing the richness and complexity of late prehistoric communities and reshaping our ideas of the period just prior to European colonialism.

WAS MKE May 2018 Poster.jpg
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Apr
29
12:00 PM12:00

Heim Mound Work Day

We are going to be having a work day at the Wisconsin Archeological Society's Heim Mound site on this coming Sunday afternoon from noon to 4 pm.  Our focus will be the removal of periwinkle (vinca minor) and pachysandra, two non-native and invasive ground covers which are over-running the property and choking out the native wildflowers.  Along the way, we will also be discussing the plans for future care for the property.

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Mar
21
6:30 PM18:30

Rock River Archaeological Society Program

March 2018 Program

Location: Rock River Archaeological Society N7725 Hwy. 28 Horicon, WI 53032

Speaker: Dr. William Mode, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

Title: Ice Age History of the Fox River Valley Region

About: Dr. William Mode, Professor and Chair of the Department of Geology at University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh will be presenting this very interesting program about the Fox River Valley region, a region that is definitely in our own back yard.
Dr. Mode’s research on glacial geology, palynology and climate change has taken him to the Baffin Island, Alaska, Russia and the Colorado Rocky Mountains. As a native of Wisconsin, the glacial geology of Wisconsin is also of interest to Dr. Mode. He is currently collaborating with geologists at the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey on mapping Waushara County. In his presentation, Dr. Mode will discuss the Ice Age history of the Fox River valley region and how it formed the landscape we see today.
Dr. Mode admits that research on surficial geology is actually easier to do in arctic areas than in Wisconsin, because the trees don’t get in the way in the Arctic. On top of being Department Chair, Dr. Mode’s teaching responsibilities include: Glacial Geology, Geomorphology and Honors Geology. Dr. Mode’s Ph.D. is from the University of Colorado, and he spent one year at Ohio State University as a post-doctoral fellow before coming to Oshkosh.

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Mar
15
8:00 PM20:00

WASRA Grant Applications Due

The Wisconsin Archeology Society Awards Committee is pleased to invite applications from avocational archaeologists and archaeology students for the 2018 WASRA grants. The Society Board has allocated $500 for this program in Fiscal Year 2018. In accordance with the guidelines as posted on the Society web site at http://wiarcheologicalsociety.org/wasra individual awards will not exceed $500 and may be less. Applicants must be Wisconsin Archeological Society members for consideration of the application.
The guidelines detail eligibility criteria and the application process, and they require complete packages submitted in digital format (pdf preferred) to heather.walder@gmail.com by March 15, 2018. The Committee will evaluate all proposals and announce award decisions at the Spring Wisconsin Archeological Society meeting. The guidelines also list obligations of those receiving awards.


For an example of award-winning research, please see this update from the 2017 WASRA recipient, Jeff Painter: http://wiarcheologicalsociety.org/painter-wasra 

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Mar
13
7:00 PM19:00

March Program - Robert Ritzenthaler Chapter

March 2018 Program

Location: Harrington Hall - UW-Oshkosh Campus

Speaker: Robert (“Ernie”) Boszhardt.

Title: Hidden Thunder: Rock Art of the Upper Midwest

Abstract: Rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) exist around the world, but most Wisconsinites are unaware of the rich Native American artistic heritage in our state. In the award winning book Hidden Thunder: Rock Art of the Upper Midwest renown watercolor artist Geri Schrab and archaeologist Robert "Ernie" Boszhardt share their perspectives on rock art sites in this region. Beautifully illustrated with site pictures and Schrab's paintings Hidden Thunder contains historical overviews, geological contexts, stories of discovery and destruction along with reflections by a dozen contemporary Native Americans.

Boszhardt's program will synthesize Hidden Thunder by featuring a series of sites from the book. While including examples of Schrab's paintings, this talk will emphasize the archaeological perspective. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing

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Mar
12
7:00 PM19:00

March Program - Three Rivers Archaeological Society

March 2018 Program

Location: Macktown Living History Education Center Macktown Forest Preserve
Rockton, Illinois

Speaker: Paula Bryant, Staff Archaeologist, Illinois State Archaeological Survey

Title: The Landscape of the Chicago Portage: An Archaeological Perspective

About: Considered by some as Chicago's "Plymouth Rock", the National Historic Site of Chicago Portage in the Forest Preserves of Cook County is arguably one of the last natural remnants where you can glimpse into the beginnings of Chicago. This presentation will address the unique features this landscape offered to early travelers, in addition to a range of archaeological sites associated with the area. A brief history exploring the mid-late 1970s excavations at the 1830s Laughton Trading Post (11CK150) will also be discussed.

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Feb
19
7:00 PM19:00

November Program - Milwaukee Chapter

November 2017 Program

Location: Sabin Hall 3413 N. Downer Ave, Milwaukee
Room G90 - UW-Milwaukee Campus

Speaker: Richard Edwards, PhD., RPA Carroll College, College of Lake County

Title: Risky Landscapes: Koshkonong Oneota Subsistence, Settlement, and Politics

Abstract: The Late Prehistoric of the Great Lakes region was a time of significant cultural and environmental shifts. The relatively sudden arrival of Middle and Upper Mississippian material culture in the archaeological record is associated with cooling temperatures, fluctuating rainfall, aggregated populations, and a significant reliance on agricultural foods. These changes brought new challenges, particularly associated with food security. The research presented here explores the ways that these risks were mitigated in the Koshkonong Locality of southeastern Wisconsin, and how these strategies affected daily life and both inter and intragroup politics. A combination of paleoethnobotany, zooarchaeological isotopes (canine surrogacy approach), and landscape analyses were used to interpret Koshkonong risk management systems.

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Feb
13
7:00 PM19:00

February Program - Robert Ritzenthaler Chapter

February 2018 Program

Location: Harrington Hall - UW-Oshkosh

Speaker: Adrienne Frie, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Laboratory Instructor, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh.

Title: The Culture of Nature: Animal Depictions and Faunal Remains from Early Iron Age Slovenia

About: What do animals mean to us? What did they mean to people in the past? Why do we kill and eat them, but also worship and love them? This lecture explores prehistoric human-animal relationships in Early Iron Age Slovenia and will touch on the role of animals as food, labor, and pets, and animals in religion. The results presented here are based on examinations of artifacts depicting animals dating from 800 to 300 BCE, as well as studies of animal bones from Early Iron Age sites in the Dolenjska and Bela krajina regions of modern Slovenia. In the course of this lecture I will explore the differences between real, everyday relationships with animals evidenced by faunal remains from archaeological contexts, and idealized depictions of animals presented on high status artifacts associated with feasting and personal adornment. In particular I will discuss how the results of this research demonstrate that certain species were used to demonstrate high status within local societies, both in imagery and in animal sacrifice, and how the species that we consider important for displays of status, but also for use as pets and as symbols, differ radically from our modern relationships with animals. 

Monthly meetings and programs are generally scheduled for the second Tuesday of the month from September through May. All programs sponsored by the Ritzenthaler Chapter are free and open to the public. Please extend an invitation to attend to your friends.

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Feb
12
7:00 PM19:00

February Program - Three Rivers Archaeological Society Chapter

February 2018 Program

Location: Beloit Public Library, 605 Eclipse Blvd., Beloit, WI

Speakers: Robert “Ernie” Boszhardt, Driftless Pathways LLC

Title: Hidden Thunder Rock Art and The First Mississippians in Wisconsin

About: This program combines two Wisconsin archaeology projects. The first features the award winning book Hidden Thunder: Rock Art of the Upper Midwest, which Mr. Boszhardt co-authored with artist Geri Schrab. It introduces Wisconsin rock art and juxtaposes archaeological and artistic perspectives on 12 sites, interspersed with Native American reflections. Mr. Boszhardt will illustrate ancient carvings and drawings along with Ms. Schrab’s paintings, while covering aspects of history, geology, and preservation. Second, Mr. Boszhardt will discuss a colony of Mississippians who paddled 530 miles up the Mississippi River from the ancient city of Cahokia around AD 1050 to establish a temple mound complex at Trempealeau, Wisconsin. Recent excavations shed light on why they came to Trempealeau, what they brought with them, and the size and duration of the colony. While fieldwork continues, so has public outreach and heritage tourism such as creating the Little Bluff Mounds Trail. The non-technical book Beneath Your Feet: Archaeology at Trempealeau, by Boszhardt and his wife and Driftless Pathways partner Danielle Benden, is a guide to the Trempealeau Archaeology Project. Copies of both Hidden Thunder and Beneath Your Feet will be available for purchase and signing.

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Jan
28
1:00 PM13:00

February Program - Charles E. Brown Chapter

February 2018 Program

Location: Wisconsin Historical Society Auditorium 816 State St
Madison, WI 53706

Speakers: Ryan Howell, Cardno

Title: Archaeology of the Upper Mississippi River Fur Trade

Abstract: The early village that became today’s modern town of Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin was the site of a deep and complex pre-historic and historic period occupation. At various times ruled and populated by Native Americans, the French, the British, the Spanish and then only by Americans, the village appears to have been a neutral ground/trading center going back well before pre-European times. Early French outposts begin as early as the 1680’s and the Creole “Valley French” remain a significant portion of the population in the town to this day.

Always at the outskirts of political and military control of its supposed European and Early American “owners”, Prairie du Chien’s historic residents constituted a unique collection of French voyageurs and explorers, Scots-British fur clerks and Lairds, dense Native American and Metis communities, as well as Spanish priests and former African and Native slaves. The arrival of the “Yankee Americans” in the Lead Rush of the 1820’s added but one more thread in the thick, early ethnic tapestry that was historic Prairie du Chien.  

This diverse “outpost culture” managed to find their own ways to live  and work together and adapt to each other’s cultures, economics and religions for nearly 200 years. As such, their history has much to teach our present as we struggle with such issues of cultural diversity, cultural identity and boundaries of tolerance in our own society today.

This lecture explores the general history of the village and the unique archaeology and artifacts of the village that represents the physical remains of the Early French/Terminal Native American through Terminal British periods left in the area from A.D 1675-1815.

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