May
14
7:00 PM19:00

Wisconsin's Effigy Mounds

Date: Monday, May 14, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Location: Beloit Public Library, 605 Eclipse Blvd., Beloit, Wisconsin

Speaker: Amy Rosebrough, Staff Archaeologist at the State Historic Preservation Office

About: Wisconsin’s Late Woodland residents built thousands of earthen burial mounds in the form of animals, spirits, and people between AD 700-1200. Today, new technology and review of old excavations combine to give us a more complete understanding of Wisconsin’s enigmatic effigy mound-builders and their eventual fate.

Free and open to the public.

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Mar
21
6:30 PM18:30

Rock River Archaeological Society Program

March 2018 Program

Location: Rock River Archaeological Society N7725 Hwy. 28 Horicon, WI 53032

Speaker: Dr. William Mode, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

Title: Ice Age History of the Fox River Valley Region

About: Dr. William Mode, Professor and Chair of the Department of Geology at University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh will be presenting this very interesting program about the Fox River Valley region, a region that is definitely in our own back yard.
Dr. Mode’s research on glacial geology, palynology and climate change has taken him to the Baffin Island, Alaska, Russia and the Colorado Rocky Mountains. As a native of Wisconsin, the glacial geology of Wisconsin is also of interest to Dr. Mode. He is currently collaborating with geologists at the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey on mapping Waushara County. In his presentation, Dr. Mode will discuss the Ice Age history of the Fox River valley region and how it formed the landscape we see today.
Dr. Mode admits that research on surficial geology is actually easier to do in arctic areas than in Wisconsin, because the trees don’t get in the way in the Arctic. On top of being Department Chair, Dr. Mode’s teaching responsibilities include: Glacial Geology, Geomorphology and Honors Geology. Dr. Mode’s Ph.D. is from the University of Colorado, and he spent one year at Ohio State University as a post-doctoral fellow before coming to Oshkosh.

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Mar
15
8:00 PM20:00

WASRA Grant Applications Due

The Wisconsin Archeology Society Awards Committee is pleased to invite applications from avocational archaeologists and archaeology students for the 2018 WASRA grants. The Society Board has allocated $500 for this program in Fiscal Year 2018. In accordance with the guidelines as posted on the Society web site at http://wiarcheologicalsociety.org/wasra individual awards will not exceed $500 and may be less. Applicants must be Wisconsin Archeological Society members for consideration of the application.
The guidelines detail eligibility criteria and the application process, and they require complete packages submitted in digital format (pdf preferred) to heather.walder@gmail.com by March 15, 2018. The Committee will evaluate all proposals and announce award decisions at the Spring Wisconsin Archeological Society meeting. The guidelines also list obligations of those receiving awards.


For an example of award-winning research, please see this update from the 2017 WASRA recipient, Jeff Painter: http://wiarcheologicalsociety.org/painter-wasra 

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Mar
13
7:00 PM19:00

March Program - Robert Ritzenthaler Chapter

March 2018 Program

Location: Harrington Hall - UW-Oshkosh Campus

Speaker: Robert (“Ernie”) Boszhardt.

Title: Hidden Thunder: Rock Art of the Upper Midwest

Abstract: Rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) exist around the world, but most Wisconsinites are unaware of the rich Native American artistic heritage in our state. In the award winning book Hidden Thunder: Rock Art of the Upper Midwest renown watercolor artist Geri Schrab and archaeologist Robert "Ernie" Boszhardt share their perspectives on rock art sites in this region. Beautifully illustrated with site pictures and Schrab's paintings Hidden Thunder contains historical overviews, geological contexts, stories of discovery and destruction along with reflections by a dozen contemporary Native Americans.

Boszhardt's program will synthesize Hidden Thunder by featuring a series of sites from the book. While including examples of Schrab's paintings, this talk will emphasize the archaeological perspective. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing

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Mar
12
7:00 PM19:00

March Program - Three Rivers Archaeological Society

March 2018 Program

Location: Macktown Living History Education Center Macktown Forest Preserve
Rockton, Illinois

Speaker: Paula Bryant, Staff Archaeologist, Illinois State Archaeological Survey

Title: The Landscape of the Chicago Portage: An Archaeological Perspective

About: Considered by some as Chicago's "Plymouth Rock", the National Historic Site of Chicago Portage in the Forest Preserves of Cook County is arguably one of the last natural remnants where you can glimpse into the beginnings of Chicago. This presentation will address the unique features this landscape offered to early travelers, in addition to a range of archaeological sites associated with the area. A brief history exploring the mid-late 1970s excavations at the 1830s Laughton Trading Post (11CK150) will also be discussed.

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Feb
19
7:00 PM19:00

November Program - Milwaukee Chapter

November 2017 Program

Location: Sabin Hall 3413 N. Downer Ave, Milwaukee
Room G90 - UW-Milwaukee Campus

Speaker: Richard Edwards, PhD., RPA Carroll College, College of Lake County

Title: Risky Landscapes: Koshkonong Oneota Subsistence, Settlement, and Politics

Abstract: The Late Prehistoric of the Great Lakes region was a time of significant cultural and environmental shifts. The relatively sudden arrival of Middle and Upper Mississippian material culture in the archaeological record is associated with cooling temperatures, fluctuating rainfall, aggregated populations, and a significant reliance on agricultural foods. These changes brought new challenges, particularly associated with food security. The research presented here explores the ways that these risks were mitigated in the Koshkonong Locality of southeastern Wisconsin, and how these strategies affected daily life and both inter and intragroup politics. A combination of paleoethnobotany, zooarchaeological isotopes (canine surrogacy approach), and landscape analyses were used to interpret Koshkonong risk management systems.

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Feb
13
7:00 PM19:00

February Program - Robert Ritzenthaler Chapter

February 2018 Program

Location: Harrington Hall - UW-Oshkosh

Speaker: Adrienne Frie, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Laboratory Instructor, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh.

Title: The Culture of Nature: Animal Depictions and Faunal Remains from Early Iron Age Slovenia

About: What do animals mean to us? What did they mean to people in the past? Why do we kill and eat them, but also worship and love them? This lecture explores prehistoric human-animal relationships in Early Iron Age Slovenia and will touch on the role of animals as food, labor, and pets, and animals in religion. The results presented here are based on examinations of artifacts depicting animals dating from 800 to 300 BCE, as well as studies of animal bones from Early Iron Age sites in the Dolenjska and Bela krajina regions of modern Slovenia. In the course of this lecture I will explore the differences between real, everyday relationships with animals evidenced by faunal remains from archaeological contexts, and idealized depictions of animals presented on high status artifacts associated with feasting and personal adornment. In particular I will discuss how the results of this research demonstrate that certain species were used to demonstrate high status within local societies, both in imagery and in animal sacrifice, and how the species that we consider important for displays of status, but also for use as pets and as symbols, differ radically from our modern relationships with animals. 

Monthly meetings and programs are generally scheduled for the second Tuesday of the month from September through May. All programs sponsored by the Ritzenthaler Chapter are free and open to the public. Please extend an invitation to attend to your friends.

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Feb
12
7:00 PM19:00

February Program - Three Rivers Archaeological Society Chapter

February 2018 Program

Location: Beloit Public Library, 605 Eclipse Blvd., Beloit, WI

Speakers: Robert “Ernie” Boszhardt, Driftless Pathways LLC

Title: Hidden Thunder Rock Art and The First Mississippians in Wisconsin

About: This program combines two Wisconsin archaeology projects. The first features the award winning book Hidden Thunder: Rock Art of the Upper Midwest, which Mr. Boszhardt co-authored with artist Geri Schrab. It introduces Wisconsin rock art and juxtaposes archaeological and artistic perspectives on 12 sites, interspersed with Native American reflections. Mr. Boszhardt will illustrate ancient carvings and drawings along with Ms. Schrab’s paintings, while covering aspects of history, geology, and preservation. Second, Mr. Boszhardt will discuss a colony of Mississippians who paddled 530 miles up the Mississippi River from the ancient city of Cahokia around AD 1050 to establish a temple mound complex at Trempealeau, Wisconsin. Recent excavations shed light on why they came to Trempealeau, what they brought with them, and the size and duration of the colony. While fieldwork continues, so has public outreach and heritage tourism such as creating the Little Bluff Mounds Trail. The non-technical book Beneath Your Feet: Archaeology at Trempealeau, by Boszhardt and his wife and Driftless Pathways partner Danielle Benden, is a guide to the Trempealeau Archaeology Project. Copies of both Hidden Thunder and Beneath Your Feet will be available for purchase and signing.

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Jan
28
1:00 PM13:00

February Program - Charles E. Brown Chapter

February 2018 Program

Location: Wisconsin Historical Society Auditorium 816 State St
Madison, WI 53706

Speakers: Ryan Howell, Cardno

Title: Archaeology of the Upper Mississippi River Fur Trade

Abstract: The early village that became today’s modern town of Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin was the site of a deep and complex pre-historic and historic period occupation. At various times ruled and populated by Native Americans, the French, the British, the Spanish and then only by Americans, the village appears to have been a neutral ground/trading center going back well before pre-European times. Early French outposts begin as early as the 1680’s and the Creole “Valley French” remain a significant portion of the population in the town to this day.

Always at the outskirts of political and military control of its supposed European and Early American “owners”, Prairie du Chien’s historic residents constituted a unique collection of French voyageurs and explorers, Scots-British fur clerks and Lairds, dense Native American and Metis communities, as well as Spanish priests and former African and Native slaves. The arrival of the “Yankee Americans” in the Lead Rush of the 1820’s added but one more thread in the thick, early ethnic tapestry that was historic Prairie du Chien.  

This diverse “outpost culture” managed to find their own ways to live  and work together and adapt to each other’s cultures, economics and religions for nearly 200 years. As such, their history has much to teach our present as we struggle with such issues of cultural diversity, cultural identity and boundaries of tolerance in our own society today.

This lecture explores the general history of the village and the unique archaeology and artifacts of the village that represents the physical remains of the Early French/Terminal Native American through Terminal British periods left in the area from A.D 1675-1815.

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Jan
10
6:30 PM18:30

Winter Dinner

The upcoming Winter Dinner will be hosted on January 10th at the Milwaukee Beer Bistro. The event will begin at 6:30 pm with a cash bar, appetizers and coffee, dinner will begin at 7:00 pm. This years featured speaker, Dr. Melissa Baltus, will be speaking on Neighborhoods of Cahokia - Excavations at the Spring Lake Tract.
Please RSVP by January 2nd. Two options to RSVP include sending registration card and payment to Rob Ahlrichs or paying online here.
Any questions regarding the diner may be directed to Rob Ahlrichs via emailat ahlrichs@uwm.edu.
 

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Jan
9
7:00 PM19:00

January Program - Robert Ritzenthaler Chapter

January 2018 Program

Location: Harrington Hall - UW-Oshkosh Campus

Speaker: Matthew E. Velguth, Director, Gills Rock Petraglyph Preservation Organization.

Topic: Gills Rock Pictographs, Door County, Wisconsin. Description: In 1657 a battle between the Anishinabe (Ojibwa) and the Iroquois took place in Hedgehog Harbor, near Gills Rock, Wisconsin. The story of this battle was kept alive by the Pottawatomi who told it to the Icelandic and Scandinavian settlers of the Door Pennisula. The Anishinabe created a mural commemorating this battle. The mural and the story faded into myth, but was rediscovered in October 2016. The residents of Gills Rock have formed a non-profit (Gills
Rock Petraglyph Preservation Organization) to preserve the site and make it accessible to the public. The Gills Rock Petraglyphs: Archives of Stone, which describes the site and chronicles its history, was published this past winter. Velguth’s August appearance on Channel 14's CW 14 Focus program, hosted by Robert Hornacek can be accessed at:
http://cw14online.com/cw14-shows/cw14-focus/native-american-rock-art-in-door-county

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Dec
12
7:00 PM19:00

December Program - Robert Ritzenthaler Chapter

December 2017 Program

Location: Halsey Hall - UW-Oshkosh Campus

Speakers: Jordan Karsten, Ph.D., Trisha Jenz, and Tre Blohm, Anthropology Program,
University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh.

Topic: Bioarchaeology of Ukraine: New Research on Dog Domestication and Paleopathology

Abstract: This presentation focuses on new research conducted by UWO students on the archaeological collection produced by recent excavations at the Eneolithic site of Verteba Cave, Ukraine, which is associated with the Tripolye archaeological culture.
Part of the new research aims to investigate biocultural interactions by studying ancient disease among the Tripolye, specifically, by using ancient DNA to identify the presence of tuberculosis. The Tripolye culture were the first archaeological culture in Eastern Europe to live an agropastoral lifestyle and establish large settlements with high population densities. This novel adaptation would have had significant implications for health, especially as compared to earlier mobile hunter-gatherers. One impact could have been the introduction of disease due to close association with domesticated animals. One such example is tuberculosis. Tuberculosis has been infecting humans since ancient times and persists in many regions today. Tuberculosis is caused by the organism Mycobacterium tuberculosis which originated 15,000 to 20,000 years ago and has since evolved into 16 different strains known as the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Complex (MTBC). Through ancient DNA analysis, we were able to document the presence of MTBC among the Tripolye.
The second aspect of the new research at Verteba Cave focused on interpreting the Tripolye use of dogs. Specifically, we examined the dogs from site 17 of the Tripolye mortuary site (3951-2620 cal BC), located in Ternopil Oblast, Ukraine. Symbolic representations of canids have been observed on some pottery found at the site. The faunal sample (n = 7560) from site 17 contains mainly domestic mammals (n = 1389, 18%) and shell (n = 577, 8%). Canids (n = 122) are rare and comprise around 2% of the faunal sample and only 9% of the domestic fauna. The dog remains are from at least six individuals, three adults and three subadults. Individual teeth were the most common dog elements recovered, including two perforated canines and one perforated lower M1. These teeth may have been a component of body ornamentation that was -2- incorporated into the Tripolye burial practices or deposits. The other dog elements were found in context with other feasting deposits suggest that they were consumed as a part of Tripolye mortuary ritual. Preliminary research routes show that dog domestication and identification can be complicated. To date, for the sample at Verteba Cave, we have investigated the timing and aspects of dog domestication, markers of domestication on skeletal remains of canids, symbolic representation on ceramics from Verteba Cave, and the use of perforated canines as body ornamentation.

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Dec
11
7:00 PM19:00

December Program - Three Rivers Archaeological Society Chapter

December 2017 Program

Location: Macktown Living History Education Center Macktown Forest Preserve, Rockton, Illinois

Speakers: Jenny Benish, Cultural Research Archaeologist and Luke Cavallaris, Staff Archaeologist, Illinois State Archaeological Survey

Title: Archaeology in the Forest Preserves of Cook County: Revisiting the Huber Site (11CK1)

Abstract: Learn about the wide range of archaeological sites managed by the Forest Preserves of Cook County, from campsites of the first Paleoindians who traveled to the area during the last ice age to World War II prisoner-of-war camps. Glimpse into the past, gain a sense of place, and understand the stewardship challenges of these non-renewable resources. The field survey of one these significant sites, the Huber Site (11CK1), has provided important information by updating site limits, adding temporal affiliations, and defining clusters. The portion of the site currently stewarded by the Forest Preserves of Cook County is the only remaining vestige of this important prehistoric village site. Management efforts to preserve, nominate for Illinois Nature Preserve status, and repair damage from decades of looting is underway as part of the Natural and Cultural Resources Master Plan

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Dec
7
7:00 PM19:00

December Program - Charles E. Brown Chapter

December 2017 Program

Location: 

Speakers: John H. Broihahn, Wisconsin Historical Society

Title: The Clam Lake Mound Site in the 21st Century

Abstract: Through the agency of UW-Madison professor Ralph Linton students from across the Midwest and the staff of the Milwaukee Public Museum investigated the Clam Lake Mound Site (47Bt1) in 1935. The results of the work startled the excavators, riveted public attention, and changed our understanding of Western Great Lakes history. The results of the project continue to provide insights on Wisconsin’s deep history, inform research, and guide management decisions.

Free and open to the public

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Dec
3
3:00 PM15:00

Myths and Mysteries: Underwater Archaeological Investigation of the Christmas Tree Ship, Rouse Simmons

On November 22, 1912, the Rouse Simmons departed Thompson, Michigan, with a load of Christmas trees bound for Chicago. She never arrived. Despite desperate searches, no one knew where or why she was lost. It was not until 1971 that the Rouse Simmons was discovered in 170 feet of water. Since that time the story of the Rouse Simmons, better known as the Christmas Tree Ship, has grown to legendary proportions. The Wisconsin Historical Society conducted the first formal survey of the Rouse Simmons wreck site for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. Learn what the Society’s dive team found, both at the wreck site and in historical documents, to learn more about what happened that fateful November day in 1912.

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Nov
26
9:00 AM09:00

Nitschke Mounds Care Day

Take the opportunity to visit the Nitschke Mounds and help preserve the site on Sunday, November 26 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM. This Nitschke Mounds Care Day is weather dependent, and will cancel in the event of rain.

The volunteers will continue clearing buckthorn and other invasive plant species from the mounds. Stumps will be treated and the brush will be dragged out to burn piles. It is recommended that volunteers bring the following: water, appropriate clothing for the weather and woods, boots, and work gloves (if you have them, some spare sets will be provided). There will be safety glasses and some tools for brush clearing, but volunteers are welcome to supply their own clippers or small hand saws.

Kurt Sampson, the event coordinator, is planning a pot luck picnic break. Volunteers are encouraged to bring a small, simple dish to contribute to the picnic. Please provide your own water or beverage for the work day and the break.

If you are able to volunteer, please contact Kurt Sampson and tell him what you will be bringing for the lunch.
Email: kurtsampson68@gmail.com
Phone: 414-405-4367 cell

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Nov
20
7:00 PM19:00

November Program - Milwaukee Chapter

November 2017 Program

Location: Sabin Hall 3413 N. Downer Ave, Milwaukee
Room G90 - UW-Milwaukee Campus

Speaker: Ryan Howell, M.A., RPA

Title: Archaeology Along the Upper Mississippi River Fur Trade Periphery: French and British-Period Sites at Prairie du Chien

See attached flyer for more information

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Nov
14
7:00 PM19:00

November Program - Robert Ritzenthaler Chapter

November 2017 Program

Location: Harrington Hall - UW-Oshkosh Campus

Speaker: Ray Reser, Ph.D., Director, Museum of Natural History, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. Topic: Paleoindian of Arizona.

Title: Tracking the Ephemeral: Mammoths, Shrapnel and the Pursuit of Man in the Tularosa Basin.

Abstract: Pleistocene trackway sites associated with evidence of human occupation or resource extraction are rare in North America. The iconic White Sands National Monument in southern New Mexico offers both unique insights and significant challenges to interpreting Paleo-Indian occupation of a once resource-rich environment
now dominated by the planet’s largest gypsum dune field. Ichnofossils associated with a suite of Pleistocene fauna occur along the paleo strandlines of fossil Lake Otero on White Sands Monument within the closed drainage system of the Tularosa Basin. These trackways, potentially associated with early human presence in the area, seasonally become exposed, and weather away rapidly due to climate and sediment characteristics. A host of unexploded ordinance from decades of use as a live-fire air training field keeps the fieldwork interesting.

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Nov
5
3:00 PM15:00

Cova de la Pastora: A Study of Death and Discovery in the Prehistory of Spain

In the 1940s, the discovery of a burial site in the hills outside of Alcoi, Spain created an international stir. The remains of up to 70 people with copious precious and unusual grave goods including beads and carved bone idols were exhumed from the cave. Several of the individuals had trepanations – holes carved into their skulls while alive – that were the first to be documented in Spain. Dating to the Late Neolithic/Eneolithic (ca. 3000 BC), the quality of grave goods and the communal burial rite suggested to archaeologists of the day that an elite group had been buried at this location and Cova de la Pastora became a poster child for the emergence of social inequality in the region. We challenged this interpretation, and beginning in 2007 in a joint project with the University of Valencia, we re-analyzed the finds and conducted new excavations at the site. We also reconstructed the old excavations and how material was recovered, moved from the site to various museums, and subsequently analyzed over a 60-year period. In the process we found a rich tapestry of scientific history along with new discoveries on the timing and nature of burials in this cave. This presentation tells the story of death and discovery at Cova de la Pastora.

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Nov
2
6:30 PM18:30

Great Shipwrecks of Wisconsin

Social at 6:30, Awards 7:00, Lecture 7:30

 

Dive into the history hidden beneath the waves with Wisconsin Historical Society's maritime archaeologist, Tamara Thomsen. Explore Wisconsin's Great Lakes shipwrecks through underwater video, historic photographs and archaeological discoveries! Learn how the Wisconsin Historical Society documents these time capsules of our maritime past. Call MVAC at 608-785-6473 or e-mail mvac@uwlax.edufor more information.

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Oct
21
1:00 PM13:00

Fur Trade in Wisconsin

OSHKOSH PUBLIC MUSEUM - PEOPLE OF THE WATERS
WEEKLY PROGRAM

Speaker: Isaac Walters, Wisconsin educator, instructional coach, and historic reenactor and consultant

The fur trade was Wisconsin's first truly global economic endeavor. In the mid-17th century, the French came to Wisconsin looking for furs, bringing with them an array of goods from all over the world. Isaac Walters explains what the fur trade was, how it worked, and who was involved. He also takes a look at the facts and myths of the fur trade.

This program is associated with the grand opening of the People of the Waters exhibit at the Oshkosh Public Museum. For more information, please see the exhibit web page (http://www.oshkoshmuseum.org/oshkoshPublicMuseum/exhibitionsPrograms/
permanentExhibitions/peopleWaters).

This event is free with general admission. Please contact Karla Szekeres at 920.236.5763 or email kszekeres@ci.oshkosh.wi.us to register for this event

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Oct
21
1:00 PM13:00

Down Home Archaeology: Digging into the Past with Local Archaeologists

International Archaeology Day (IAD) is a celebration of archaeology and the thrill of discovery. Every October the Archaeological Institute of America and organizations around the world present archaeological programs and activities for people of all ages and interests. In past years Milwaukee IAD activities have drawn upwards of 60 members of the public and have provided fun and interactive ways to explore themed topics and a variety of archaeological subjects.

This year to celebrate International Archaeology Day the AIA Milwaukee Society is hosting “Down Home Archaeology: Digging into the Past with Local Archaeologists.” Milwaukee and the surrounding areas have a large archaeological community, with archaeologists working all over the world on a variety of cultures and with a vast number of materials. Join the AIA Milwaukee Society at UWM’s Sabin Hall to learn about how local archaeologists do their research, from analyzing human and animal bones, making 3D models of artifacts and sites, reconstructing and analyzing ancient pottery and stone tools, to making ancient beers!

International Archaeology Day will be celebrated here in Milwaukee on Saturday October 21, 2017, from 1:00 to 4:00 pm on the UWM campus. Come to the first floor of UWM’s Sabin Hall (3413 N. Downer Ave.) and join us for an exciting afternoon doing archaeology with local specialists, from experimental archaeology to helping identify and analyze ancient artifacts! FREE and open to the public. Fun for all ages!

This event is co-sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America, Milwaukee society and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Departments of Anthropology, Art History, and FLL Classics Program.

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Oct
14
1:30 PM13:30

October Presentation - Kenosha Archaeology Society

Location: The Civil War Museum

Speakers: Katherine Sterner and Robert Ahlrichs

Title: Examining the Use-Lives of Archaic Cache Bifaces from the Riverside Site

Abstract: The Riverside Site is a Red Ochre affiliated burial and habitation site in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, excavated by the University of Michigan, the Milwaukee Public Museum and the Oshkosh Public Museum. During the Late Archaic to Early Woodland transition, people throughout the Midwest buried their dead with red ochre and numerous exotic goods, including caches of blue gray chert bifaces. Bob Hruska’s 1961-1963 excavations at Riverside uncovered a total of 83 bipointed bifaces. In an effort to connect “ritual” burial furniture to anthropologically visible behaviors, a sample of the bifaces cached in five different burial features at the site were analyzed for traces of use-wear. This new data, in conjunction with reanalysis of Hruska’s original privately held records and pictures provides interesting insights into Terminal Late Archaic culture in the Western Great Lakes.

The presentation is free and open to the public. Kenosha Archaeology Society meeting to follow presentation.

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Oct
14
1:00 PM13:00

Honor Song!

Oshkosh Public Museum - People of the Waters
Weekly Program

Honor Song! A play by Carol O. Smart, granddaughter of Dr. Rosa Minoka-Hill

The inspiring story of Dr. Rosa Minoka-Hill (1876-1952), an early Native American woman physician and the first woman to receive honorary lifetime membership to the Wisconsin Medical Society. Dr. Hill graduated from the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1899. In 1905, she married an Oneida man and they moved to the reservation in Wisconsin where she operated a “kitchen clinic” at her house. This is a story of remarkable challenges endured by a fierce compassion.

This program is associated with the grand opening of the People of the Waters exhibit at the Oshkosh Public Museum. For more information, please see the exhibit web page (http://www.oshkoshmuseum.org/oshkoshPublicMuseum/exhibitionsPrograms/
permanentExhibitions/peopleWaters).

This event is free with general admission. Please contact Karla Szekeres at 920.236.5763 or email kszekeres@ci.oshkosh.wi.us to register for this event.

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